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Public History – Thematic Units

HOU > Public History (DIS) > Public History – Thematic Units

DIS 50: INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HISTORY

Unit Code: DIS 50

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:First (1st)

Language of instruction:Greek

Purpose-description

Public history is history produced for the general public and disseminated in written, visual, audio, digital form in the public sphere. Public history is a component of the historical culture of a society and therefore should be both a subject of study and a field of scholarly specialization. Public history, while following the scientific and methodological norms of academic history, is addressed to a wider audience and in this respect, public history has the character of training historians to address a wider audience. The module aims to familiarise students with the ways in which the past is crystallised, institutionalised and transformed into object, exhibit, spectacle and reading.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Public history as a distinct field of scholarly specialization
  1. History between the past and the present
  1. History, memory and collective identities
  1. History in the public sphere and the political uses of the past

Learning outcomes

At the end of the Unit, students are expected to:

  • have an understanding of the field of public history and the role of the “public historian”
  • have an understanding of the relationship between academic history and public history
  • be aware of the difference between the past and history and the process by which the past can be transformed into a historical narrative
  • have an understanding of the importance of memory in shaping contemporary historical culture and collective identities.

 

Grade weighting of the unit: :

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will presentthis paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There areno prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 51: THEORIES OF HISTORY AND HISTORIOGRAPHY

Unit Code: DIS51

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit:Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:First (1st)

Language of instruction:Greek

Purpose-description

The aim of this module is the analytical and critical presentation of the currents that have determined the way history is interpreted and written, from the time of the formation of modern “professional” historiography in the early 19th century until today, i.e. the modern currents that still influence the way historians perceive the subject of their research and their profession. Emphasis is placed on the ideological premises of each historiograDIScal current, with the aim of highlighting the points of tension and/or ‘coincidence’ between the scientific and ideological demands of each era and each intellectual trend, with particular reference to the global historical events that marked the 19th and 20th centuries. In addition, the course includes the history of Greek historiography, from the time of the strengthening of the threefold scheme of Greek historicism in the context of academic historiography until today.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. The writing of history in the 19th century: historicism, national historiography, positivist school
  1. Developments in European historiography in the first half of the 20th century: the Annales school, economic history, Marxist historiography
  1. Modern trends in historical science
  1. History and the social sciences
  1. Greek historiography in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the programme students are expected to:

  • have a global view of the development of historiography
  • – be able to understand how the social sciences have contributed to the renewal and reorientation of historians’ concerns and methods and, conversely, – have received the influence of historical science towards the recognition of the historicity of the phenomena they study.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There areno prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 52: HISTORY AND SOURCES

Unit Code: DIS52

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:First (1st)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

The processing of sources, their identification, verification and interpretation is one of the most crucial processes of historical science. The development of a variety of methods for their use, as well as the evolution of theoretical approaches to what counts as a historical source, goes hand in hand with the constitution of history itself into a scientific discipline and its evolution. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with historical sources, both theoretically and practically, that is, to explore, theorize, analyze, and comment on the ways in which sources are used and utilized in the modern era, traversing a variety of historiograDIScal movements and the ways in which each has addressed the question of sources-from nineteenth-century positivism to cultural history and 21st-centurypostmodernism. Particular emphasis is placed on the methodology of oral history, as interviewing and oral testimony in general is one of the areas of engagement for those working in public history.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Types and identification of sources
  1. Types of sources and types of sources
  1. Oral history
  1. Sources and public history

Learning outcomes

After the end of the unit the students:

  • Will be able to identify the sources that have been used to write a historical work, thus understanding the core of historical research, i.e. how an event, once selected, is organically integrated into a description, explanation and broader interpretive scheme.
  • Will be able to critically present a piece of historical evidence, relate it to its period and point out possible elements that contribute to the advancement of historical research.
  • Will be able to compare a wide range of evidence, from written texts to images and oral testimony, and to indicate the different qualities of historical evidence that each can offer the researcher.
  • Will be able to locate a document in an archive, library or on the internet and give an opinion on its degree of authenticity.
  • Will be able to conduct interviews for the purposes of historical research.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work andthe adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Written Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 53: HISTORY AND EDUCATION

Unit Code: DIS 53

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:Second (2nd)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

School history is situated between academic and public history. In general, it follows the advances in historiography and is periodically updated by incorporating as much of the new findings and new explanatory schemes as are widely accepted in the field of academic history. At the same time, however, it is forced to adapt to state curricula, which tend to reflect either narrowly the official state ideology or more broadly the dominant assumptions of a society about its past. Consequently, the physical space of school history is that fuzzy and ever-changing territory in which the two intellectual practices ( academic and public history) meet, infiltrate each other, interact and interchange. In this perspective, school history could be seen as the official public history. The first aim of this course is to demonstrate when, how and why school history produced and disseminated the central representations of our national past and how, subsequently, it became itself trapped in the role of reproducing the now dominant representations. To this end, a history of school history will be sketched, it will be shown when and why it was limited to a celebratory biography of the nation, and what the possibilities are today to free it from its phenomenological role and make it a vehicle for the cultivation of a reflective historical consciousness. A second, equally central purpose is to impart the skills necessary for graduates to construct teaching scenarios that are more readable, multimodal and engaging than those provided by conventional textbooks.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Detailed history programmes
  1. Controversies over school history textbooks
  1. History teaching scenarios
  1. International associations for history education

Learning outcomes

At the end of the module, students are expected to:

  • be able to present the main intersections and continuities in the history of school history.
  • be able to present the central controversies about school history textbooks as they unfolded from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day.
  • be able to distinguish the differences between narratives of the same historical theme in different school textbooks; be able to propose explanations for these differences by placing the narratives in their historical context.
  • be able to distinguish the crucial differences in the way a topic is presented and analysed in a history study and in a history textbook; be able to propose explanations for these differences.
  • be able to search for and identify critical texts for textbooks and to propose explanations for the different evaluations.
  • be able to compare solemn speeches given by teachers at school festivals and to distinguish central changes from one season to another. Be able to write a solemn speech more valid, understandable and engaging than existing ones.
  • be able to construct a digital teaching scenario for one of the school history lessons which, compared to a conventional lesson, is more readable and engaging.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are noprerequisites for this unit.

DIS 54: HISTORY AND MEDIA

Unit Code: DIS 54

ECTS Credits:10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:Second (2nd)

Language of instruction:Greek

Purpose-description

The relationship between history and media is a multifaceted and complex but also dynamic one. The press and the now traditional electronic media, radio and television were until recently, and still are, the main shapers and expressors of public history: history in political and public discourse in general is produced and expressed through them, shaping in a decisive way the political and historical culture of a society. The press and other media both record and shape the relationship of modern societies with history and the management of their collective memory; they disseminate and produce historical knowledge, perceptions and stereotypes. The following will be examined: their function as agents in shaping political culture and historical consciousness, their mediating role between politics and history, and their self-serving uses of history. The press reflects the changes taking place in a society, the expectations of contemporaries and the ways in which they perceive the reality they experience. Despite the silences, its systematic study and the assembly of texts into a corpus captures aspects of human experience that are not traceable in other sources by the historian.

The aim of the unit is both to study the historical dimensions of this relationship and to highlight the ways in which it operates in today’s reality.

Cognitive Objects of the Thematic Unit:

  • Type and Modernity. History of the European and Greek press (15th-20th century).
  • The press as a historical source.
  • Topics in the history of radio and television.
  • History of the 20th century and the electronic media.
  • History in the press and electronic media today (inserts, documentaries, radio programmes)

Learning outcomes

At the end of the Unit, students are expected to:

  • understand the multiple functions of the media in shaping the collective historical culture;
  • understand today’s complex and changing political and social reality.
  • develop complex historical thinking and form an open historical culture.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 55: HISTORY AND SPACE

Unit Code: DIS 55

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:Second (2nd)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

The aim of this unit is to explore the use of space as a field of historical research and its transformation into public history practices, methods and modes that transform scientific research into practice in public space. Focusing on cities, we will examine the social dimension of space, that is, space as a creation of society and at the same time as a field of manifestation of social relations. In this context we are interested in looking at the historicity of space, its social, political and economic mechanisms of production, its public and private use, the experiential relationship of people with it and the perceptions that are formed about it. We are interested in space as a building material for the constitution of national, class and cultural identity and as a field of manifestation-public performance of its characteristics.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Social and cultural history of the city
  1. Local history and history of the “local”
  1. Space and oral history
  1. Space and memory
  1. Cultural policies, cultural heritage and space

Learning outcomes

At the end of the above Thematic Unit, students are expected to:

  • use space as a field of historical research, highlighting its importance in shaping historical culture,
  • identify in space the traces of memory, both official and non-official,
  • design historical routes in the city for educational and tourist use,
  • carry out oral interviews aimed at highlighting the memory of specific social groups (immigrants, refugees, workers, students, etc.),
  • develop methods of bringing history to the public sphere,
  • identify and process archival sources of local history (archives of municipalities, associations, clubs, sports clubs, etc.),
  • create digital databases,
  • select archival material for historical exhibitions, historical documentaries or historical internetsites,
  • use mass media to highlight historical research,
  • distinguish the various movements of political protest and place their action in its wider political, economic and social context,
  • collaborate with people from different scientific fields (architects, urban planners, visual artists, journalists) in the planning and implementation of Public History actions, combining theoretical knowledge and practice.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work andthe adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit ΠΗΙ Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There areno prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 60: HISTORY AND STATE INSTITUTIONS

Unit Code: DIS60

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered:Third (3rd)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

History is an important policy area for every state for both external and internal reasons. The legitimisation of its power, the consolidation of its claims on other states, the unification of its populations (national identity politics) are just some of these reasons.

This section focuses on the range of ways in which the state apparatus, the government of a state and its individual institutions produce history through a number of cases from around the world that relate to both the modern and pre-modern period. Particular emphasis is placed on the twentieth century and especially on developments from World War II to the present day.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Ritual as a means of forging official history
  1. The museum as a mechanism for the formation of the ideal citizen
  1. Monuments and naming: the construction of the national landscape
  1. Legislation and History

Learning outcomes

At the end of the Unit, students are expected to:

  • be familiar with basic theoretical tools and concepts necessary for the interpretation of state policies on history.
  • recognize the different ways in which a state authority can shape the historical narrative.
  • distinguish the different state historical policies that develop from country to country depending on the different socio-historical contexts and the political situation at the time.
  • be able to find a variety of evidence on the Internet and critically comment on it.

Grade weighting of the unit:

To successfully complete a Thematic Unit you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and affects your final grade in the specific module to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their assessment contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Paper, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will present this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your professor and a small group (6-8 people) of your fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Paper reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, in other words, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Semester Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 64: ΠΡΟΦΟΡΙΚΗ ΙΣΤΟΡΙΑ

Unit Code: DIS61

ECTS Credits: 10

Unit Type:Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered: Third (3rd)

Coordinator of the unit:

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit:

Oral history is both a research methodology, with a focus on interviewing/life-telling, and a cultural product – the study of the past from the perspective of the often unsung protagonists of history. It studies recorded or videotaped accounts of lived experiences on behalf of those who lived them first-hand. The rapidly growing use of oral testimony in the public sphere makes oral history a component of public history. Moreover, the increasing use of oral history as an educational tool at all levels of education creates new needs for the scientific expertise of teachers in this field. The thematic module introduces students to the central theoretical concepts of oral history, its specialized research techniques, the specific ethical issues involved in the management of sensitive personal data and the multiple possibilities of practical applications of oral history in the public sphere.

Learning outcomes:

At the end of the unit, students are expected to:

-understand the importance of oral history in the representation of the lived past in the public sphere

– have an understanding of the concept of the subject and the inter-subjective relationship in the process of narrating life through oral history

– be aware of the technical, methodological and ethical requirements of oral history, as well as the possibilities of its application

– have an understanding of the relationship between oral history and public history

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. Oral history as a distinct field of scientific specialisation
  2. Oral history as a research methodology
  3. Applications of oral history / Oral history in practice

Analytical structure

  1. Oral history as a distinct field of scientific specialisation

Identification of the subject of oral history and reference to the most important theoretical developments to date. The uniqueness of the oral source and the distinction of oral history from other related fields. Life narrative as a privileged research tool and interdisciplinarity in the choice of interpretive tools. Oral memory as the “raw material” of narrative, autobiograDIScal, individual and collective memory. Subjectivity and intersubjectivity in interviewing.

  1. Oral history as a research methodology

The oral history interview. The different stages of the process, from the organization of the preparation to the actual recording of the testimony. The different interview techniques and the role of the researcher. The archiving practices of oral testimonies and the importance of metadata. Written and oral sources. Ethical issues, intellectual property and management of sensitive personal data.

  1. Applications of oral history / Oral history in practice

The performance of the past in the public sphere and the dialectical relationship between individual and social memory. The introduction of oral history in museums in the context of the ‘New Museology’. Applications, using oral material, in museum settings. The use of oral testimonies in the theatre and the ‘animation’ of memory. Oral history in education, as a tool for cultivating critical thinking and initiation into research. The OGI (Oral History Groups) and the social significance of oral history. The relationship between oral history and the community.

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Teaching method: distance learning using the EAP’s E-Learning Platform and conducting Group Consultation Meetings (tele-GCM, face-to-face).

 

DIS 62: HISTORY AND CINEMA

Unit Code: DIS 62

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of unit:Elective

Semester in which it is offered:Third (3rd)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

Works of art, in all their forms, have always been one of the main vehicles for transmitting information, messages and interpretations about history. This applies, to an even greater extent, to cinema, one of the newest of the arts, which has been associated with history in many ways, both as a means of producing films with historical or historical content and as a means of shaping historical consciousness in a wide section of public opinion during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. The longitudinal relationship between history and cinema
  1. The specific dynamics of the film medium
  1. The dynamic dynamic of the dynamic of the cinema

Learning outcomes

After the end of the Unit, students are expected to:

  • be familiar with the main axes of theoretical reflection on the relationship between History and cinema, through the study of selected Greek and international literature and the preparation of research papers.
  • be aware of the importance and the main stakes of the relationship between History and film, with emphasis on the ability to distinguish between historical truth and the cinematic version that falls within the scope – and the limitations – of Public History.
  • be able to decode the cinematic image and, in particular, be able to distinguish between the fictional elements and the particular viewpoint of the producer and director in a historical film.
  • be able to produce a short film with historical content.
  • be able to understand the function of public history through the major paradigm of cinema, which will also serve as a guide to the corresponding dynamics of related channels, such as literature and other forms of visual, performing and contemporary audiovisual arts.

Grade weighting of the unit:

In order to successfully complete a Unit, you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and influences the formation of your final grade in this Thematic Unit to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their evaluation contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Assignment, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will support this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your tutor and a small group (6-8 people) of fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Assignment reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, that is, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Term Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

 

DIS 63: PUBLIC HISTORY IN THE DIGITAL ERA

Unit Code: DIS 63

ECTS Credits: 10

Type of unit:Elective

Semester in which it is offered:Third (3rd)

Language of instruction: Greek

Purpose-description

The field of digital everyday life – to the extent and intensity that it has been constantly reshaped from the late 1980s to the present day – constitutes one of the most critical surfaces of contemporary historical culture: On the screens of computers and mobile phones, on the digital coatings of the contemporary urban landscape, on the infinite electronic networks that delimit Western everyday life, not only the production and consumption of capital, goods, emotions or discourse about the present and the future is carried out; information, knowledge, perceptions, critiques and narratives about the past are also largely shaped. In this way,digital public historyis a crucial field for the production of historical consciousness in contemporary societies. The aim of this Thematic Unit is to delve inside this field and to highlight the diverse processes through which contemporary digital historical culture is shaped.

Cognitive Objects of the unit:

  1. The past in cyberspace
  1. Digital Reconciliation and Public History
  1. Social networks, crowdsourcing, open source, creative commons and public history

Learning outcomes

At the end of the Unit, students are expected to:

  • have an understanding of the multiple functions of digital media in shaping contemporary historical culture;
  • be able to evaluate (and explain) the value and importance of History in everyday digital life
  • to develop complex historical thinking, to form an open historical culture and, consequently, to effectively analyze contemporary phenomena and to make responsible decisions;
  • be able to produce public history themselves, such as contributing to the content of a history blog (or constructing a new one), writing or editing the entry of a digital encyclopaedia, writing a history article for the press, etc.

Grade weighting of the unit:

In order to successfully complete a Unit, you must:

  1. Participate in the weekly Educational Activities that accompany each lesson on the training platform; participation is not compulsory, but it is assessed by your teacher and influences the formation of your final grade in this Thematic Unit to the extent of 20%.
  2. Produce two Written Assignments of 500-600 words each; their evaluation contributes to the formation of your final grade by 30%. You cannot proceed to the next stage if you have not obtained at least the pass mark (5 on average) in the two Written Papers.
  3. Produce the Final Term Assignment, of 3500-4000 words; its assessment contributes to the final grade by 50%. You will support this paper in a face-to-face meeting with your tutor and a small group (6-8 people) of fellow students. The support takes the place of a written examination, is done once for each academic semester, and there is no “re-examination”. The grade on the Final Assignment reflects both the quality of your work and the adequacy of the support. In order to successfully complete the Module, you must achieve at least a grade (5) in the Final Assignment.

The final grade, that is, is derived as follows:

Unit DIS Evaluation
Educational Activities 2 0%
Written Assignment 15 % 30% (≥5)
Written Assignment 1 5 %

Final Term Assignment

(delivery and support)

50% (≥5)
Total

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for thisunit.

 

DISPD: POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA THESIS

Unit Code: DISPD

ECTS Credits: 30

Type of Unit: Compulsory

Semester in which it is offered: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

Information:

Its subject matter should be related to the units and their constituent strands, and may be based on primary empirical research or an original critical review of existing literature. In all cases, however, it should have an applied aspect – which is precisely why in almost all modules there is less emphasis on theory and more on applications.

Prerequisites: Units from the first three semesters according to the Selection Guidelines.

 

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