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Studies in Natural Sciences – Thematic Units

HOU > Undergraduate Programms > Studies in Natural Sciences (FYE) > Studies in Natural Sciences – Thematic Units

FYE10 GENERAL MATHEMATICS I

Unit Code: FYE10

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year in which it is offered: First (1st)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: The purpose of this unit is the acquisition of the necessary “language” to be able to understand, interpret, evaluate and describe both the concepts and the phenomena that will be encountered in the material of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, etc., which will be called upon to study in the Natural Sciences course.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: The successful completion of unit FYE10 “Mathematics I” provides the opportunity for the student to develop the following skills and to be able to:

  • apply the convergence criteria for numerical sequences and series
  • use the basic theorems (Darboux, Rolle, Cauchy, Mean Value, Existence of Maximum & Least Value) in solving problems such as describing the behaviour of real functions of a real variable, optimisation, existence and approximation of solutions of equations, etc.
  • use polynomial approximations (Taylor and Maclauren expansions) of algebraic and hyperbolic functions and the conditions (sphalla and intervals) under which they hold
  • use Definite, Indefinite and Generalised Integra in the context of specific applications, such as finding adversarial equations, calculating areas of plane spaces, areas of surfaces and volumes of solids by rotation, etc.
  • approach with the aid of Fourier series periodic functions

  • use the Theorems of Continuity, Productivity, Mean Value, Existence of Maximum & Least Value, Existence of Inverse Function and the Theorem of Intertwined Functions in solving problems such as the existence and description of the behaviour of real functions, more than one real variable, optimisation and approximation, with the help of Taylor’s expansion, of the values of a function of two variables, etc.
  • use the methods of Multiple Integration in the context of specific applications, such as, the calculation of areas of planar spaces, areas of surfaces and solid volumes, moments of inertia, centres of gravity, etc.
  • solve geometric problems with the aid of vectors
  • describe, with the aid of vector functions, curves and surfaces in three dimensions
  • use the Green’s, Gauss, Stokes and Helmholtz theorems to describe vector fields

General learning results

The successful completion of unit FYE10 provides the student with the ability to:

  • organise and use the knowledge acquired in solving specific problems
  • understand and summarise scientific work in the relevant mathematical fields

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • One Variable Calculus
  • Multivariable calculus
  • Introductory Mathematics

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE12: GENERAL AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Unit Code: FYE12

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type:Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year in which it is offered:First (1st)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: The main purpose of this unit is to familiarize the student with the fundamental principles of Chemistry, the close relationship of Chemistry with related scientific fields (Biology, Physics, etc.), as well as the central role of Chemistry in the technological revolution.

Unit outline

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of the Thematic Unit “General and Inorganic Chemistry” (FYE12), the student should be able to:

  • Describe the properties of electrons, protons and neutrons (atomic structure)
  • Describe isotopes and their composition
  • Calculate atomic weights from isotopic abundance and masses of isotopes
  • Name and write down formulas of common binary and ternary inorganic compounds

  • Use chemical formulae to solve various types of chemical problems
  • Relate names to formulas and charges of simple ions
  • Combine simple ions to write formulas and names of ionic compounds
  • Recognize and use standard weights and relationships between moles
  • Interconverts masses, moles and formulas

  • Determine the percent composition of a compound
  • Formulate isostatic chemical equations to describe chemical reactions
  • Interpret isostatic chemical equations and calculate moles or masses of reactants and products
  • Calculate the percentage yield of a reaction
  • Calculate concentrations of solutions resulting from dilution

  • Carry out calculations involving the use of solutions in chemical reactions
  • Describe the wave properties of light and the relationship between wavelength, frequency and speed of light
  • Interpret the wave-particle duality
  • Interpret the contribution of atomic spectra to the development of atomic theory
  • Describe the main points of the quantum mechanical picture of the atom

  • Describe the four quantum numbers and relate their values to specific atomic orbitals
  • Describe the shapes of orbitals and arrange the orbitals according to their relative energies
  • Write the electronic arrangements of atoms
  • Relate the electronic arrangement of an atom to its position in the periodic table
  • Describe the periodic table and the important relationships it summarises

  • Develope chemical periodicity in relation to the following physical properties:
  • Atomic radius, Ionization energy, Electron affinity, Electromagnetism
  • Predict whether the bond between specific atoms is essentially ionic, covalent or polarized covalent
  • Compare and contrasts the characteristics of ionic and covalent compounds
  • Describe how elements are joined by electron transfer (ionic bonding)

  • Describe energy relationships in ionic compounds
  • Predict the types of ionic compounds
  • Describe how elements join together by sharing electrons between them (covalent bonding)
  • Formulate Lewis structures for molecules and polyatomic ions
  • Identify exceptions to the rule of eight

  • Write typical charges for atoms of covalent compounds
  • Describe coordination and knows when and how to write coordination structures
  • Describe the basic ideas of VSEPR theory
  • Use VSEPR theory to predict the molecular geometry of polyatomic molecules
  • Describe the relationship between molecular geometry and polarity of molecules

  • Predict whether a molecule is polar or not
  • Describe the main features of valence bond theory
  • Distinguish the hybrid orbitals used in polyatomic molecules and ions
  • Use hybrid orbitals to describe the formation of double and triple bonds
  • Describe the key points of molecular orbital theory

  • Draw a diagram of molecular orbitals of a diatomic molecule from the corresponding atomic orbitals
  • Distinguish between bonding, antibonding and non-bonding molecular orbitals
  • Find the bond order in diatomic molecules and ions
  • Relate bond order to bond stability
  • Use the concept of electronic cloud depletion for molecules for which valence bond theory applies the concept of resonance

  • Identify and describe non-electrolytes, strong electrolytes and weak electrolytes
  • Describe Arrhenius’ theory of acids and bases
  • Describe the Bronsted-Lowry theory of acids and bases
  • State properties of aqueous solutions of acids and bases
  • Classify binary acids (acids – hydrides) in order of increasing strength

  • Classify tridentate acids (oxygen acids) in order of increasing strength
  • Describe Lewis’s theory of acids and bases
  • Completes and balances equations of acid-base reactions
  • Define acid and basic oxides and salts
  • Explains amphoterism

  • Balances oxidation-reduction equations
  • Explains the effect of a common ion and gives relevant examples
  • Identify buffer solutions and describe their function
  • Describe how to prepare a buffer of a certain pH
  • Explains what acid-base indicators are and how they work

  • Describe which chemical species are present in the different stages of a volumetric analysis (a) strong acid with strong base, (b) weak acid with strong base, (c) polyprotic acid with strong base
  • Carry out calculations based on volumetric curves for (a) strong acid with strong base, (b) weak acid with strong base, (c) polyprotic acid with strong base
  • Write expressions for constants of solubility constants Ksp
  • Use Ksp constants in chemical calculations
  • Identifies some common, insoluble ionic compounds

  • Describe fractional precipitation and how it is used in ion separation
  • Describe the occurrence in nature and use of the elements of the main groups
  • Describe compounds of the main group elements, their reactions, properties and uses
  • Describe the main sources of metals
  • Describe techniques for the pretreatment of ores

  • Describe reduction methods leading to the production of free metals
  • Describe some techniques for the purification of metals
  • Distinguish the d transition metals and describe some of their important properties
  • Describe typical oxidation states of transition metals
  • Describe the specific metallurgy of three metals: titanium, iron and copper

  • Recognise the complexing compounds
  • Use the terminology describing the complexing compounds
  • Recognises some common structures of complex compounds
  • Describe the different types of syntactic isomerism and distinguishes between syntactic isomers
  • Recognise stereoisomers

  • Describe the valence bond theory and the crystal field theory for complexing compounds
  • Interpret the origin of colours in complex compounds
  • Use the spectrochemical series to explain the colours of a series of complexes
  • Mention some applications of complexes in our daily life

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Atomic Structure – Periodic Table – Properties of Individuals
  • Chemistry of complexes and organometallic compounds
  • Modern trends and applications of inorganic chemistry

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE14: INTRODUCTION TO NATURAL SCIENCES

Unit Code: FYE14

ECTS Credits: 20

Module Type:Compulsory

Year in which it is offered: First (1st)

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Language of instruction: Greek

Γενική περιγραφή της Θ.Ε.: The main purpose is to upgrade the student’s knowledge of the Fundamental Principles of Physics and the necessary Mathematical Tools required for the scientific description of physical phenomena. After successfully completing this introductory unit, the student will have accumulated the knowledge and skills required for a fruitful follow-up of the programme of studies.

Unit Outline

Learning Results:

Upon successful completion of the programme the student will be able to:

  • Describe with equations the motion of a material body in 1, 2 and 3 dimensions, Newton’s laws of motion and rotational motion, the laws of conservation of momentum, angular momentum and mechanical energy. Explain plasmatic forces in non-inertial reference frames, distinguish the importance of conservation forces and dynamic energy. Examine motion in the gravitational field, static equilibrium of a body, the collision of two bodies, systems of varying mass, metaptic motion and complex motion of a solid body. Solve complex problems using free body diagrams, analysis of motion on axes, combining laws to describe complex solid body motion.
  • Describe simple harmonic oscillation, its solution and the physical significance of the parameters and constants of this solution, the functional form of the quantities of position, velocity and acceleration, and the kinetic and dynamic energy of a simple harmonic oscillator system. Examine the harmonic motion of the single, rotary and natural pendulum as well as the double harmonic oscillator, describe the oscillation in the presence of damping force and external damping as it occurs in real systems.
  • Describe the quantities of pressure and density of a fluid, the change of pressure in a static fluid, Pascal’s and Archimedes’ principles, the phenomena associated with the surface tension of a fluid, apply the continuity equation and Bernoulli’s equation.
  • Determine the electric potential and electric field from a static charge distribution, formulate Gauss’s law, Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s rules, Ampere’s law, Biot-Savart’s law, Faraday’s law and Lenz’s rule. Explain the motion of a charge in electric and magnetic fields and the sources of magnetic fields. Describe the concept of kinetic and mutual induction and calculate the stored energy in an electric and magnetic field. Solve problems with circuits involving resistors and capacitors, explain the operation of a capacitor, coil, transformer and current generator and the basic instruments used in electrical measurements. Infer the completeness of Maxwell’s equations for solving problems in electromagnetism.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Introductory concepts of Mathematics
  • Introductory physics

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE20: GENERAL MATHEMATICS ΙΙ

Unit Code: FYE20

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation:Scientific Area (SA)

Year in which it is offered: Second (2nd)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: General description of the unit: The aim of this unit is the acquisition – from the student’s side – of the necessary ability to understand, interpret and describe basic concepts and to solve many problems of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, etc. This mathematical training is necessary for two reasons:

  • it familiarises the student with mathematics as the common language of all the sciences, and
  • It enables the student, at a later stage, to apply the methods of computer science correctly to practical problems such as those described in this unit.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of the unit, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the basic concepts of Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations.
  • Combine basic mathematical concepts with those of Linear Algebra and Differential Equations.

  • Solve problems in Linear Algebra using matrices, rulers, linear systems, linear transformations and characteristic matrix quantities.
  • Solve Ordinary Differential Equations of first and higher order and linear systems of differential equations.
  • Apply Linear Algebra and Differential Equations to describe and model the behaviour of physical systems or phenomena in mathematical terms and equations.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Linear algebra

  • Linear Algebra I. Differential Equations I

Prerequisites: FYE10

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE22: PHYSICOCHEMISTRY

Unit Code: FYE22

ECTS Credits: 14

Unit Type:Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year in which it is offered: Second (2nd)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: The main purpose of this unit is to introduce the student to the fundamental principles of physical chemistry, as well as its applications in all areas of the Physical Sciences.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of the Unit “Physical Chemistry” (FYE 22), the student should be able to:

  • describe the definitions and fundamental concepts and develop the three basic laws of thermodynamics

  • define the basic thermodynamic functions, the concept of chemical potential and ideal gas
  • derive the constitutive equation of ideal gases
  • describe the ideal gas mixture
  • describe the deviation of the behaviour of gases from the ideal behaviour and give examples of constitutive equations for real gases
  • define the stoichiometry of a reaction and describe the concept of the progression of a reaction

  • write and understand the general equilibrium condition of a chemical reaction
  • define the chemical equilibrium constant, the standard Gibbs free energy of a reaction, and the standard thermodynamic functions for the formation of compounds
  • describe the temperature dependence of the chemical equilibrium constant and the effect of pressure and temperature conditions on the performance of a chemical reaction
  • formulate the phase equilibrium condition by means of chemical potentials and describe qualitatively the dependence of the chemical potential of the three phases of a substance on temperature and pressure
  • derive and write the Clausius-Clapeyron equation

  • draw the boundary lines between the three phases in a diagram (p,T) and describe the equilibria of two or three phases
  • define the ideal solution on the basis of the chemical potential
  • write Raoult’s and Henry’s Laws
  • define the microstate of a system and its macrostate
  • defines the statistical set required for the study of the macroscopic system

  • describe the accessible states of a system
  • calculate the statistical weight of a distribution of a system among its accessible states, the sum of states Q of the normal statistical set, and the thermal wavelength of a particle
  • calculate the thermodynamic functions of a system from the normal sum of states
  • report and calculate the four contributions to the molecular sum of states of a substance, due to the different modes of movement of its constituent molecules
  • describe the kinetic theory of gases and, on the basis of this theory, calculate thermodynamic properties and transport properties of a perfect gas

  • describe the main characteristics and quantities of electromagnetic radiation
  • describe the basic principles of rotational or microwave spectroscopy, infrared or vibrational spectroscopy of diatomic molecules and Raman spectroscopy
  • interpret infrared spectra of multi-atomic molecules
  • describe the basic principles of electronic absorption spectroscopy and interpret the corresponding ultraviolet-visible spectra
  • describe the magnetic properties of the atomic nuclei of the constituent molecules and the basic principles and concepts of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

  • describe the modern technique for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra and interpret two-dimensional NMR spectra
  • interpret electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of atoms or molecules carrying a single or unpaired electron
  • define basic concepts of chemical kinetics, such as chemical reaction rate, kinetic equation and order of reaction
  • apply the following methods to determine the kinetic equation of a reaction: the differential method, the method of initial rates, the isolation technique, the method of integration and the method of sub-doubling times
  • write and apply the Arrhenius equation

  • describe the process of searching for the mechanism of a chemical reaction
  • describe the basic mechanisms of two-way reactions, sequential reactions, parallel reactions and chain reactions, and the main methods for their kinetic study
  • describe the two main theories of chemical reactions: the collision theory and the transition state theory
  • explain the terms electrochemical element, electrode, electrolyte, electrolyte, anode, cathode, half-element, half-reaction, electrolysis
  • describe how an electrochemical element works and describe the overall reaction that takes place in it

  • indicate the different types of ionic conductors (electrolytes)
  • describe how ions behave in the presence of other ions because of the interactions between them
  • explains how the movement of ions within ionic conductors takes place
  • describe the structure of the electrode-electrolyte interface
  • explains the conventions for the representation of electrochemical elements and the sign of the electric force

  • predict the spontaneous direction of a redox system from measurements of electrodynamics
  • describe the electrochemical equilibrium state for an interface and for an electrochemical reaction
  • explain the dependence of the equilibrium potential on the energies of the electroactive species
  • write Nernst’s equation
  • explain the relationship between the rate of an electrochemical reaction and the potential difference at the electrified interface

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Chemical Thermodynamics
  • Chemical Kinetics
  • Electrochemistry
  • Statistical Thermodynamics

  • Spectroscopy

Prerequisites: FYE12

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE24: CLASSICAL PHYSICS Ι

Unit Code:ΦΥΕ24

ECTS Credits: 14

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year in which it is offered: Second (2nd)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: The aim of the unit is for the student to study in depth the fundamental principles of Classical Mechanics, Classical Electromagnetism and Thermodynamics and to apply them to the study of phenomena.

Unit Outline

Learning Outcomes: the FYE24 unit comprises three lessons: Classical Mechanics, Thermodynamics and Electromagnetism. Knowledge of derivatives and integrals is required for all three courses. Knowledge of ordinary differential equations or concurrent enrolment in the FYE20 unit is desirable. Especially for Electromagnetism, knowledge of vectors as well as their use is essential. Knowledge of epicycles and surface integrals is desirable.

Upon successful completion of the module, the student:

  • will know the beauty of Classical Mechanics, that all its results are proved by Newton’s laws.
  • will be able to study one-dimensional and three-dimensional motions of material points either by solution of differential equation of motion or by the method of energy, when allowed.
  • will be able to study the rotation of solid bodies about a fixed axis.
  • will be able to write the equations of motion of point masses in coupled harmonic oscillators (any and all coupling modes).
  • will know the fundamental concepts of thermodynamics (such as heat, work, internal energy, entropy) and will be able to use the laws of thermodynamics to solve simple problems.

  • will know the four laws of electromagnetism.
  • will be able to calculate the electric field that produces an electric charge distribution and the magnetic field that produces a constant electric current.
  • will be able to calculate the electric field caused by a varying magnetic flux.
  • will be able to calculate the magnetic field caused by a varying electric flux.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Engineering
  • Thermodynamics
  • Electromagnetism

Prerequisites: FYE14

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

LPHΙ: LABORATORY UNIT PHYSICS Ι

Circle: First (1st)

Year: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits: 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive Subjects:

1. Classical Physics

2. Modern Physics

Unit Outline

LCHΙ: LABORATORY CHEMISTRY Ι

Circle: First (1st)

Year: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits: 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive Subjects:

1. General and Inorganic Chemistry

2. Analytical Chemistry

3. Physical Chemistry

4. Organic Chemistry

Unit Outline

FYE30: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Unit Code: FYE30

ECTS Credits: 16

Unit Type:Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

YearThird (3rd)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the session: main purpose of this unit is to familiarise the student with the structure and properties (physical and chemical) of the members of the most important homologous series of organic chemistry and simple mechanisms of organic reactions, the structure and functionality of organic compounds found in living organisms (biomolecules) which usually carry more than one functional group and the basic spectroscopic techniques that allow the identification of the structure of organic compounds.

Unit Outline

Learning Results:Upon completion of the studies, the student will be able to:

  • Recognize the structures of molecules and the basic reactions of organic chemistry
  • Know the main spectroscopic techniques
  • Understand the basic principles and rules of stereochemistry
  • Distinguish the main classes of organic compounds & biomolecules, understand their properties and the mechanisms of their basic reactions
  • Apply the main spectroscopic techniques in combination to elucidate the structure of simple molecules

  • analyse contrastively the structures of simple organic molecules
  • Propose reaction sequences for the synthesis of simple organic molecules, designing the most efficient sequence of chemical reactions

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Bond series
  • Stereochemistry and mechanisms of organic reactions

  • Spectroscopy of organic compounds
  • Biomolecules

Prerequisites: It is strongly recommended that the student take unit FYE30 first than or in parallel with unit FYE31, otherwise she will encounter difficulty in the Biochemistry unit (FYE31/2).

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE31: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE CELL

Unit Code: FYE31

ECTS Credits: 16

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

YearThird (3rd)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: the main purpose is to introduce the student to the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the Cell. After successful completion of this unit, the student will have accumulated the knowledge and skills required to understand the molecular basis of life. Upon successful completion of this module, the student will have accumulated the knowledge and skills required to understand the molecular basis of life.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: The concepts presented and analysed in this thematic unit are based, in part, on knowledge acquired in FYE12 (General and Inorganic Chemistry) and FYE22 (Physical Chemistry), while they are complemented by knowledge acquired during the course of the third year subject FYE30 (Organic Chemistry). FYE31 deals with three fundamental subjects in Biology (Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology). The integration of these three disciplines in FYE31 (Cell Structure and Function) stems from their relevance and overlap. The unstructured approach used in teaching facilitates the understanding of the concepts presented in these related disciplines and highlights their interdependence. The main topics presented are:

Cell Biology

  • Organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms
  • Membranes and transport of substances
  • Cell signalling and interactions
  • Subcellular organelles: structure and functions

  • Nucleus and chromosomes
  • Cellular movement
  • Cell Proliferation and Reproduction

Biochemistry

  • Structure and function of proteins and macromolecules

  • Catabolism (glycolysis, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, β-oxidation, urea cycle)
  • anabolism (gluconeogenesis, fatty acid and amino acid synthesis)
  • Nucleic acid and protein biosynthesis
  • Metabolism regulation

Molecular biology

  • Nucleic acid structure
  • Replication, transcription, translation
  • Regulation of the expression of genetic information
  • Mutations, Viruses
  • Recombinant DNA technology

Learning Results: Upon completion of the unit the student should be able to:

  • Classify the macromolecular complexes found in cells and link them to their functions
  • describe the structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
  • Analyse the composition and functions of biological membranes
  • Correlate cellular functions with the subcellular compartment in which they are carried out

  • Develop the mechanisms of cellular communication and signalling
  • Understand the levels of organisation of protein molecules in the cell
  • Link the structure of proteins to their function
  • Describe the basic biochemical pathways of catabolism and relate them to the mechanisms of energy production in cells.
  • Describe the main metabolic pathways of anabolism used by the cell to synthesise its ‘components’

  • Explain the flow of genetic information in cells and describe the mechanisms by which this is accomplished
  • Describe the basic ways in which the cell uses to regulate the expression of its genes
  • Understand the ways in which mutations are created and their effects on the organism
  • Apply theoretical knowledge to predict and understand the applications of genetic engineering.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Cell Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Prerequisites:It is strongly recommended that the student take unit FYE30 first than or in parallel with unit FYE31, otherwise the student will encounter difficulty in the Biochemistry unit (FYE31/2).

Evaluation:Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’).

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE34: CLASSICAL PHYSICS ΙΙ

Unit Code: FYE34

ECTS Credits: 16

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year Third (3rd)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: It offers the student the basic knowledge about (a) coupled oscillations and waves, (b) Special Relativity and the principles of General Relativity, (c) the principles of Quantum Mechanics and Nuclear Physics and their applications in the interpretation of physical phenomena.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of the unit the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of coupled oscillations and apply mathematical techniques to determine the frequencies and relative amplitudes of normal oscillation modes to solve related problems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and phenomena of wave theory such as Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves, Contribution and Diffraction and Geometric Optics and be able to apply them to solve related problems.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of the Special Theory of Relativity, its consequences such as time dilation, length contraction and Doppler shift, be familiar with Lorentz transformations and relativistic definitions of quantities such as momentum and energy and be able to apply them to solve relevant problems. Describe the principles of General Relativity.
  • Describe the experimental results which led to the introduction of quantum mechanics and its basic concepts and principles such as the wave function and its connection with probability density, Schrödinger’s equation, indeterminacy, particle-wave duality and identify and understand the solutions of Schrödinger’s equation for problems involving either one-dimensional dynamics such as infinite wells, the step, the harmonic oscillator, or three-dimensional Coulomb potentials and their consequences such as energy and angular momentum quantization, the tunnel effect and be able to use them to interpret related phenomena and solve related simple problems.

  • Describe the laws of statistics governing the behaviour of different types of particles (bosons, fermions) and be able to use them to explain relevant phenomena and to solve related simple problems.
  • Describe the predictions of quantum theory for Atoms, Molecules and Solids such as the periodic table of elements, emission and absorption spectra and band theory as well as modern applications of quantum mechanics such as the laser and the transistor.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and applications of nuclear physics such as the nuclear model, decays a,b,c, radioactivity, radiochromatography, nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, fusion and know the fundamental interactions of nature and Elementary Particles as the fundamental building blocks of matter and apply them to solve related simple problems.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Relativity

  • From Classical to Quantum Physics
  • Oscillations and Waves

Prerequisites: FYE24

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

LCHΙΙ: Laboratory Unit Chemistry ΙΙ

Year: Third (3rd)

Circle: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits (ECTS): 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive subjects:

1. General and Inorganic Chemistry

2. Analytical Chemistry

3. Physical Chemistry

4. Organic Chemistry

Unit Outline

LBGΙ: LABORATORY UNIT BIOLOGY I

Year: Third (3rd)

Circle: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits (ECTS): 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive subjects:

1. Cell Biology

2. Molecular Biology

3. Genetics

4. Biochemistry

5. Bioinformatics

6. Physiology

Unit Outline

FYE40: QUANTUM PHYSICS

Unit Code: FYE40

ECTS Credits: 14

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: The main purpose of the unit is to study in depth the fundamental principles of Quantum Mechanics while acquiring computational skills in order to study phenomena of Atomic-Molecular Physics, Nuclear Physics and Elementary Particle Physics.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: : Upon completion of the course the student will be able to:

  • Understand the fundamental principles of quantum physics.
  • Apply the general theory to a variety of problems involving bound states and simple scattering processes.

  • Characterise and analyse the behaviour of nuclei.
  • Compare theoretical results with experimental data.
  • Understand the basic principles of elementary particles (physical properties, classification and interactions).
  • Understand and evaluate modelling results published in some scientific journals.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Quantum mechanics
  • Introduction to Nuclear Physics
  • Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics

Prerequisites: FYE34

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

FYE43: GENETICS

Unit Code: FYE43

ECTS Credits: 14

Unit Type: Compulsory

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: The aim of this unit is for the student to become familiar with the basic principles of three branches of Biology: genetics, physiology and evolution, as well as the relationship between them. They will become familiar with the elements of heredity and how these are passed from generation to generation; how the diversity of living organisms is created and the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped their current appearance; the origin and maintenance of life through an understanding of the structure, function and interaction of physiological systems.

Unit Outline

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Describe the basic principles of genetics in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms
  • Understand the relationship between phenotype and genotype
  • Describe the basic principles of genetic mapping
  • Understand the regulation of gene expression

  • Understand the basic principles of mutagenesis
  • Understand the basic principles of developmental genetics
  • Understand the basic principles of genetic engineering
  • Explain introductory concepts of human physiology
  • Describe the cellular and tissue organisation of the human body in relation to the functions and interactions of different cell types and tissues.

  • Describe the basic principles and theories of evolution
  • Explain the processes and mechanisms of evolution.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Genetics
  • Physiology

  • Evolution

Prerequisites: FYE31

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

LPHΙΙ: LABORATORY UNIT PHYSICS ΙΙ

Year:Fourth (4th)

Circle: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits (ECTS): 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive Subjects:

1. Classical Physics

2. Modern Physics

Unit Outline

LBGΙΙ: LABORATORY UNIT BIOLOGY ΙΙ

Year:Fourth (4th)

Circle: Second (2nd)

Type of workshop: Compulsory

Workshop Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA), Skills Development (SD)

ECTS Credits (ECTS): 6

The Laboratory of Physics is of two (2) laboratory cycles with:

Cognitive Subjects:

1. Cell Biology

2. Molecular Biology

3. Genetics

4. Biochemistry

5. Bioinformatics

6. Physiology

Unit Outline

FYE41: EVOLUTION OF IDEAS IN NATURAL SCIENCES

Unit Code: FYE41

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year:Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction:Greek

Prerequisite knowledge

Students should have a good knowledge of General Physics and special topics in Wave Physics, Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Quantum & Modern Physics.

Contents

History of Physics and Chemistry (with emphasis on ancient times, Arabs (10th-12th century), Scientific Revolution (16th-17th century & modern physics).

History of Biology (concepts of life phenomena in antiquity and the Middle Ages, Renaissance, modern times).

Philosophy of Science (Philosophical currents, Historical dimension in philosophy of science, Modern trends in philosophy of science, Conceptual approach.

Learning Results:

Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be aware of the general course of the development of ideas in the natural sciences. They will realise that while natural phenomena remain the same, human approach and interpretation of them has varied throughout history.

In particular, the student will learn about the history of Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and typical “adventures” in the human approach to the interpretation of natural phenomena.

The student will also learn about the reception of proposed interpretations by the scientific community and structured society. He/she will realise that the field of scientific research is open to the future and holds surprises that lead to reversals of established perceptions, norms and theories.

General skills:

  • General knowledge of the field of science.

  • General knowledge of science in general; general knowledge of the field of physics.
  • Ability to learn, creativity, creativity, ability to create, creativity, creativity, creativity, ability to learn, ability to learn, creativity, ability to learn, creativity, ability to create.
  • Interdisciplinarity.
  • Written & oral communication skills.
  • Existence of an ethical code in science.

  • Use of a second language.

Special skills:

  • Knowledge and understanding of theories for the interpretation of natural phenomena.
  • Understanding and understanding the theory of theories and theories of theories.
  • Acquisition of skills useful for teaching physics.

  • Knowledge of the temporal evolution of theories, models, patterns.
  • Familiarisation with the search for and evaluation of information.
  • Global knowledge of physics – conceptual approach.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • History of Physics & Chemistry

  • History of Biology
  • Philosophy of Science

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

FYE42: PLANET EARTH

Unit Code: FYE42

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit:

Unit Outline

Learning Results: : Upon completion of the unit, the student will be able to know:

  • The basic elements of the structure of the Earth’s solid crust, types of rocks, their formation mechanisms, the mechanism of formation and classification of volcanoes. They will also know the causes of formation and the basic characteristics of earthquakes and a simplified methodology for estimating the size and location of their foci.

  • The structure and composition of the oceans and their seabed, the ocean-atmosphere-land interaction phenomena, the equations governing ocean kinematics, the already existing waves and their formation mechanisms and tides.
  • The general description and characteristics of the biosphere, ecosystems and the flow of energy and cycles of matter in them and the basic characteristics, in space and time, of biological communities.
  • The structure and chemical composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, the mechanisms of creation and destruction of stratospheric ozone, the dynamics of the atmosphere. Also, the basic characteristics and meteorological causes of air pollution and the simple Gaussian model for estimating the dispersion of gaseous pollutants as a function of meteorological conditions in a region.
  • The basic principles of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, the characteristics of the Sun and solar wind, the Earth’s magnetosphere and the basic equations of celestial mechanics.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Lithosphere
  • Hydrosphere
  • Biosphere
  • Atmosphere
  • Space Physics

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

Mid-term examination:From the academic year 2017-2018, the unit is offered the possibility to participate in an optional mid-term examination after the completion of the first part of the syllabus. Part b’ of the syllabus will be examined after its completion, as a continuation of the examination period, while the re-examination will be offered for both parts independently and will be conducted in accordance with the applicable regulations.

PLI10: Introduction to Computer Science

Unit Code: PLI10

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Year: Fourth (4th)

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: The main purpose of the unit is to familiarize the student with the fundamental principles of Computer Science and Information Management, to acquire basic knowledge of problem-solving algorithms, techniques, tools and languages of structured programming, as well as principles of program development. The aim is also to acquire knowledge in the use of simple and complex data structures and in the management of information systems, in order to be able to follow the evolutionary path of technology, information technology and their applications in the present and in the future.

Learning Results:

VOLUME 1: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE

Upon successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will know:

  • the historical development of the computer
  • the history of computer science and its applications
  • the structure of the computer and the functionality of its various subsystems
  • the way in which data and information are stored and represented in a computer
  • the different numbering systems and arithmetic operations in them

  • basic logic gates and circuits
  • the concepts of programming, algorithms and programming languages
  • the basic principles of systems software and applications and introductory concepts of databases and computer networks

Upon successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will understand:

  • the ways of storing, transmitting and processing data

  • the operations in different numerical systems
  • the process of constructing logical – digital circuits
  • the concepts of algorithm, application and systems software and databases
  • the ways of interconnecting computers in networks

After successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will be able to:

  • perform number conversions and arithmetic operations in different number systems
  • design logical (digital) sequential circuits
  • use Program Flow Diagrams to design algorithms

After successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will be able to:

  • describe the various computer subsystems and their functionality

  • categorise the basic subjects of computer science and its applications

After successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will be able to:

  • compose logic circuits from gates
  • represent algorithms with Program Flow Diagrams

Upon successful completion of the study of Volume 1, students will be able to:

  • evaluate the impact of computer science on the present and future of technology and society.

VOLUME 2: PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES

After successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will know:

  • the concept of algorithms, programming practices, principles of program design, program suitability test criteria, principles of structured programming, and programming structures
  • advanced procedural programming techniques, such as the use of subroutines, recursion and regression

  • specific programming issues (software documentation, debugging)
  • the basic concepts of object-oriented programming and the characteristics of the main programming languages

Upon successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will understand:

  • the stages of solving a problem, how to design programs and the principles of program development
  • the concepts of variable, data type, data structure, operator, parameter and expression

  • the communication between the main program and subprograms,
  • the operation of classification and search algorithms
  • the scope of variable declaration

After successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will be able to:

  • state the characteristics of an algorithm

  • describe an algorithm in verbal (pseudocode) and symbolic (program flowchart) representation
  • design algorithms by applying basic programming practices
  • design algorithms by applying program design methodologies
  • apply defensive programming techniques
  • perform classification and search algorithms

Upon successful completion of the study of volume two, students will be able to:

  • categorize the main programming languages

On successful completion of the study of volume two, students will be able to:

  • design algorithms using tables and linked lists

After successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will be able to:

  • select programming structures for implementing algorithms
  • evaluate the suitability of programs
  • evaluate the efficiency of an algorithm

VOLUME 3: DATA STRUCTURES

Upon successful completion of the study of Volume 3, students will know::

  • the concept of a data structure (abstract data type) and its difference from an atomic data type
  • the functionality of data structures: table, list, stack, queue, binary search tree, heap tree

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will understand:

  • the different ways in which a data structure can be represented in computer main memory
  • the different ways in which data can be stored in the main memory of the mainframe; the different algorithms for ordering data and the different ways of searching for data (linear, binary) in a table

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will be able to:

  • calculate the complexity functions of simple algorithms
  • calculate the order of magnitude of a complexity function from its analytical expression
  • design variations and/or combinations of the various ordering and search algorithms
  • calculate the representation function and the mode of realisation of a table when given the mode of representation and, conversely, calculate the

  • the address of a random element of a table from the mapping function
  • design modifications of extensions or combinations of the basic algorithms of operations on lists, stacks, queues, binary search trees and heap trees

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will be able to:

  • categorize data structures and their various applications

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will be able to:

  • implement programs using the basic data structures (table, list, stack, queue, tree)

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will be able to:

  • evaluate the efficiency of a data structure using the concepts of spatial and temporal complexity

VOLUME 4: PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES

After successful completion of the study of volume 4, students will know:

  • the structure of a C programming language program as a set of functions
  • the concepts of logical and syntactic error and debugging
  • the function of decision commands in C programming language
  • the logical operators and logical operations of the C programming language
  • the basic data types of the C programming language and their use in representing the data of their programs

  • the concept of a table and how to define variables of table type
  • the concept of a struct, either as the type of a variable or as the type of the constituent elements (nodes) of an interconnected list
  • the concept of dynamic memory and how it is implemented in the C programming language by means of pointer type variables
  • the passing of variables by value and by reference (use of pointers), the differences between them, and how to use parameters by reference in functions for
  • returning values at their call point

Upon successful completion of the study of volume four, students will understand:

  • the differences between the three modes of iteration in the C programming language (for, while, do – while) and the situations in which each of them shows
  • advantages over the others
  • how to declare functions in the C programming language, and how a function returns a value in its context or performs a function without
  • returning a value (void)

  • in which cases the use of dynamic memory is superior to the use of fixed-size structures (tables)
  • the concept of a recursive function, and the advantages/disadvantages over an iterative (looping) function
  • the concept of modular programming and the step-by-step refinement technique for designing their programmes

Upon successful completion of the study of volume four, students will be able to:

  • describe their solutions to computational problems with programs in the C programming language

  • describe the operation and the results of a simple program in C programming language
  • use a simple programming tool IDE (Integrated Development Environment – Dev-C++ in PLE-10)
  • debug programs that show syntactical or logical errors
  • exploit the potential of dynamic memory in C-language programs to store dynamically changing
  • structures

  • debug programs using pointers and dynamic memory
  • pass parameters to functions using pointer-type variables

Upon successful completion of the study of volume four, students will be able to:

  • select appropriate programming structures, as well as variables (static or dynamic memory) for the basic functions of their programs

Upon successful completion of the study of volume four, students will be able to:

  • design a program in C programming language that implements their solution to a computational problem using modular programming techniques and the stepwise refinement technique

Upon successful completion of the study of volume four, students will be able to:

  • provide an estimate of the memory and runtime requirements for the functions they implement (either recursive or iterative)
  • optimise parts of their programs to increase their efficiency

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Introduction to Computer Science
  • Programming Techniques
  • Data Structures
  • Programming languages

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

PLI11: PRINCIPLES OF SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY

Unit Code:PLI11

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year:Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: General description of the unit: The main purpose of the unit is to introduce students to Computer Science as an applied engineering science, which provides a set of documented principles, methodologies and techniques, with the help of which one can develop quality software products. Students will first be trained in the basic principles and concepts of Software Engineering, before studying specific issues and areas of application of the methodologies it encompasses. Two very important and widespread areas of application of IT are Operating Systems and Databases. Furthermore, students will study techniques for evaluating the complexity and practical application of computer-based problem-solving algorithms. In addition to the transfer of knowledge and the acquisition of skills in the application of software engineering methodologies, the course aims to encourage students to adopt a positive attitude towards the application of widespread principles and methodologies in software development. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of software, develop a spirit of cooperation and satisfy the needs for which the software system was developed.

Learning Results:

SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY I

Upon successful completion of the unit, the student will be able to:

  • Describe and explain the basic concepts of software technology (software, tools, processes, methodologies, life cycle, etc.).
  • Recognise the fundamental importance of the basic principles of software engineering in the development of quality software and applications.

  • Describe the different phases through which a software application passes and the main characteristics of the main software life cycle models.
  • Distinguish the requirements of a software application and use the principles of structured analysis to describe them.
  • Effectively use the most familiar diagrammatic models of software representation (data flow diagrams, state transition diagrams, etc.) to analyse the requirements of an application.
  • Design a software application based on the principles of structured design (architectural design, design of delegations, detailed unit design, etc.).
  • Explain and apply appropriate error avoidance techniques when coding a software application to produce quality source code without errors.

  • Describe the different stages and explain the different strategies used to test software modules and systems.

DATABASES

On successful completion of the unit, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the basic concepts and models of databases and the main differences between a database and a database management system.
  • Recognise the fundamental need to use database technology in any application that requires efficient organisation and management of large volumes of interrelated data.

  • Explain the different ways of organising and accessing data (fields, records, indexes, trees, etc.) in modern database systems.
  • Distinguish between the different levels of analysis and design of a database (conceptual, logical and physical).
  • Effectively use the entity-relationship model for the conceptual design of a database.
  • To complete the design of a database at the logical level using the relational model as a direct continuation of the initial conceptual design.
  • Effectively use theoretical query languages (e.g., relational algebra) to retrieve data from a relational database.

  • Implement a database in a modern relational database management system and apply in practice well-known query language patterns (e.g., SQL) to efficiently organize, manage, and retrieve data from it.

OPERATING SYSTEMS I

Upon successful completion of the unit, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the basic functions of an operating system.
  • Recognise the fundamental role of operating systems in the performance of modern applications and systems, through the increased capabilities they offer for the simultaneous execution of multiple processes and simultaneous service of multiple users.

  • Describe the different ways of scheduling processes in the central processing unit of a computer system and explain their differences and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • Explain the problem of mutual exclusion and use effectively the basic mechanisms for synchronising and communicating processes (flags, etc.) of a multi-processing operating system.
  • Describe the operation and distinguish the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of organising and managing the main memory of a computer system.
  • Generalise the use of the basic methods of memory organisation (paging, segmentation) to more complex hybrid memory systems as they are now used in modern computer systems.
  • Explain how ideal memory organisation works and distinguish between the different page replacement algorithms used in modern operating systems.

  • Solve practical problems and exercises relating to the above basic concepts and mechanisms of a modern operating system (process management, CPU scheduling, process synchronisation and communication, main memory management, main memory management, organization of virtual memory).

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Software Technology I
  • Operating Systems I
  • Databases

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in or completion of PLI10 is required for PLI11.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

PLI23: TELEMATICS, NETWORKS AND SOCIETY

Unit Code: PLI23

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: General description of the unit: The main purpose of the unit is to familiarize the students with the basic conceptual and technological versions of telematics and internet services, as well as to enhance their reflection on the psychosocial implications of these services. The ultimate aim of the project is to build up a core of aware and critical citizens in cyberspace, to highlight and highlight the range of technological options available and to place them in the context of the proposed dominant and alternative social, historical and economic versions of the evolution of technology. This perspective aims to win over even those who resist the dominance of information technology and its prospects, through critical considerations of the paths and achievements of the last.

Learning Results:

Upon successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:

  • Explain and present the basic principles of modern telematics networks and services.
  • Analyse and design wireless and mobile (GSM, UMTS, etc.) networks.

  • Explain Internet addressing schemes.
  • Distinguish between routing algorithms and Internet protocols.
  • Relate telematics services to distributed object-oriented technology and service-oriented architecture.
  • Discuss the architecture of the World Wide Web (WWW).
  • Compose methods of the HTTP protocol.

  • Create simple web pages using HTML and CSS.
  • Build dynamic Web applications by inserting client-side (JavaScript) and server-side (PHP) scripts into HTML code.
  • They complete server-side (PHP) scripts with databases (MySQL).
  • They design data description on the Web using XML.
  • Transform XML descriptions using XSL.

  • Measure and evaluate the performance of the Internet and the World Wide Web.
  • Analyze caching and proxy techniques on the Web.
  • Explain search and security mechanisms on the Web.
  • Discuss the growing and diversifying social impact of Information and Communication Technologies.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Telematics
  • Cognitive aspects of telecommunication: Telematics; Networks – Web
  • Computers and society, Information society

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

PLI35: PROTECTION AND SECURITY OF COMPUTER SYSTEMS

Unit Code:PLI35

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

Learning Results:

Computer security

Upon successful completion of this unit, students will:

  • know the basic terminology of this scientific area
  • be familiar with the basics of Operating System Security
  • be able to develop and manage access control techniques
  • be able to understand the techniques for protecting an information system against malicious software

  • understand and apply risk assessment methods
  • be familiar with basic legal issues of data protection
  • be able to develop an Information System Security Plan

Network Security

Upon successful completion of this unit, students will:

  • know the basic terminology of this scientific area
  • understand the OSI network security architecture
  • be able to manage Internet security issues
  • know how to apply security techniques at the application layer
  • be able to manage selected application security systems

  • be familiar with basic legal issues of communications privacy

Cryptography

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

  • know the basic terminology of this scientific area
  • know the basic mathematical background of cryptography

  • be familiar with the basic fundamentals of cryptography and the basic principles of cryptography
  • be able to manage a cryptosystem
  • be able to exploit digital signatures
  • be familiar with the basic legal issues involved in the use of cryptographic applications

Cognitive Objectives:

  • Computer security
  • Network Security
  • Cryptography

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

PLI37: COMPUTER SCIENCE & EDUCATION

Unit Code: PLI37

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: the purpose of the unit is the study of basic issues related to computers from an educational point of view, which are of course inherently linked to educational software. The main points on which the subject matter of the module focuses are: computer-assisted instruction, learning theories, educational software, open educational environments (with emphasis on Logo), the place of computing in education, the teaching of computing, programming as a subject of education, educational software design, models and development tools, evaluation of educational software, prototyping and quality control.

Learning Results:

VOLUME 1: TEACHING OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

After successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will know:

  • the place of Computer Science in Education as a subject and as a teaching and learning tool (models and theoretical approaches)
  • the place of Computer Science in Greek Education (curricula, teaching approaches)
  • the basic concepts that constitute the field of Computer Science Education

  • the role of programming activity as a subject of education
  • specific issues of computer science teaching, in particular structured and ontocentric programming

Upon successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will understand:

  • the role of computer science as a subject in education
  • the basic teaching approaches of Computer Science and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) at all levels of school education

Upon successful completion of the study of the first volume, students will be able to:

  • design teaching activities and educational scenarios for teaching the subject of computer science
  • use appropriate educational software in the teaching of computer science
  • implement and evaluate teaching activities and educational scenarios for teaching the subject of computer science

VOLUME 2: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

Upon successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will know:

  • the approaches and theoretical models for the integration of Information and Communication Technologies in education
  • the evolution of the place of IT and ICT in education
  • the different types of educational software
  • the categories of educational software and computing environments supporting teaching and learning

  • learning theories and teaching strategies using ICT in education (behaviouralism, constructivism, socio-cultural approach)
  • basic principles of communication and user-computer interaction
  • basic principles of educational software design and evaluation

Upon successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will understand:

  • the concept of educational software and its usefulness in educational practice

  • the concept of the open computing environment and its usefulness in teaching and learning
  • basic issues of educational software design and evaluation

Upon successful completion of the study of the second volume, students will be able to:

  • use appropriate educational software in the teaching of individual subjects in primary and secondary education
  • use distance learning environments in teaching and learning

  • to judge effectively the educational applications of information and communication technologies in education
  • design teaching activities and educational scenarios for teaching and learning across the curriculum
  • design teaching activities using e-learning environments

VOLUME 3: DESIGN OF EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE

Upon successful completion of the study of the third volume, students will know:

  • the principles of instructional design of educational software
  • the principles of screen, interface, navigation, content and interaction design
  • the models of educational software development models
  • educational software development tools
  • audio, image and video digitisation issues

  • educational software documentation issues
  • the principles of evaluation of educational software
  • the principles of didactic evaluation of educational software
  • the principles of technological evaluation of educational software
  • the principles of quality control and quality assurance of educational software

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will understand:

  • the importance of educational software design
  • the importance of educational software evaluation
  • the importance of quality control and quality assurance of educational software

Upon successful completion of the study of volume three, students will be able to:

  • design multimedia material for educational use
  • design distance learning applications using e-learning tools
  • design simple educational software
  • develop distance learning applications for teaching computer science
  • evaluate educational software

  • evaluate e-learning environments
  • evaluate distance learning environments
  • use qualitative and quantitative methods, techniques and tools to evaluate educational software

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Computer science education

  • Courses on Computer Science and Education
  • Educational software design

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

PLI44: SIGNALS AND IMAGE PROCESSING

Unit Code: PLI44

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction:Greek

General description of the unit: the aim of the unit is to introduce the student to signals and their processing. The field of signals and systems is now a unified set of basic and fundamental knowledge for a wide range of areas related to the generation, processing, storage and transmission of information. In Volume A we introduce the basic concepts of signals and systems, as well as the basic mathematical tools (Fourier and Laplace transforms). In Volume B we deal exclusively with digital signal and image processing. We learn about the discrete Fourier transform and the z-transform so that we can move on to the design of digital filters. Finally, we introduce the basic concepts of digital image processing. In Volume C we continue with digital image processing, focusing on its refinement, segmentation and description, and systems.

Learning Results: Upon successful completion of the unit, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts of signals and systems, Fourier transform, Laplace and Z transforms, convolution, sampling, frequency response and digital filters of one-dimensional signals and images.

  • Process signals in one dimension (speech, electrocardiogram, seismic signal, etc.) or in several dimensions, correctly digitise different continuous signals, calculate the frequency content of the signals and design basic filters for their processing.
  • Apply digital image processing techniques, such as image enhancement, segmentation and description, as adopted in systems.
  • Analyse and design continuous and discrete-time signal processing systems.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • Signals & Systems

  • Digital Image & Signal Processing.
  • Image Analysis & Pattern Recognition

Prerequisites:There are no prerequisites for this unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

EKP63: TEACHING NATURAL SCIENCE

Unit Code: EDU63

ECTS Credits: 20

Unit Type: Elective

Unit Characterisation: Scientific Area (SA)

Year: Fourth (4th)

Language of instruction: Greek

General description of the unit: The Thematic Unit aims to familiarize students with:

  • the systematic examination of problems related to the understanding of physical-scientific concepts,
  • the use of existing research data – especially those relating to students’ misconceptions – in teaching,

  • corrective intervention in the transformation of the content to be taught,
  • the exploitation of existing learning tools so that they can be effectively integrated into teaching.

In particular, the Thematic Module addresses the following central questions:

  • What are the factors that determine and define School Science as an autonomous field of knowledge?
  • What are the necessary skills, knowledge, attitudes and values that are deemed necessary for students to develop through the teaching of Science?

  • What are the pupils’ initial ideas regarding concepts and phenomena in science and how can these form the starting point for the construction of school science knowledge?

The Module is addressed to those who intend to do a PhD thesis in the area of Science Teaching. Most importantly, it aims to assist teachers in everyday practice by introducing a contemporary reflection on the specificity of Science and its teaching.

Learning Results: Upon completion of the Thematic Unit the student will be able to,

  • identify the main problems that students face in understanding basic concepts and phenomena in science
  • understand and justify the necessity of teaching science

  • explain how knowledge of pupils’ practical-experiential perceptions of science can help to improve the organisation of teaching
  • briefly describe the general characteristics of pupils’ perceptions
  • indicate the main changes introduced in the role of the teacher by the new model of teaching in PE
  • recognise and uses teaching tools such as cognitive conflict, analogical thinking and goal-obstacles
  • recognise the main features and differences between the different epistemological positions on the nature of scientific knowledge

  • describe and distinguish the different concepts that students use in order to understand and explain concepts and phenomena in science
  • recognise the role and character of informal and non-formal forms of science education
  • recognise the changes that science knowledge undergoes when it is transformed into school knowledge and compare their characteristics
  • analyse and describe the constitution and organisation of the school version of science in different types of teaching material.

Cognitive Subjects of the unit:

  • The need for systematic examination of science teaching
  • Basic conceptual framework of science teaching
  • Modern methods of teaching science such as: general characteristics of teaching, criteria for the selection of content, learning processes, pacing and assessment methods, design and development of teaching materials.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for the unit.

Evaluation: Written assignments during the academic year, the average of the grades of which contributes to the final grade of the thesis by 30%, provided that it is eligible for the final or the re-examination. Final written examinations, the grade of which contributes 70% to the final grade of the unit (35% for the examination of part a’ and 35% for the examination of part b’)

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